Finally Financial Freedom: Investing in Tax Liens

Published: 03rd February 2009
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A Tax Lien is a claim imposed by the federal government to liquidate a person's property until the tax and debt owed is fully paid. Investopedia Stated: Tax liens can be purchased from the government in the form of an investment. A tax lien may be imposed for failure to pay city, county, estate, income, payroll, property, sales, or school taxes. The lien continues until the tax liability is satisfied or becomes unenforceable. Our goal is to provide valuable information to individuals and firms involved in the investment of tax sale property.





Payment of a tax lien may occur through various methods. Generally, in the event a tax lien on personal property is not paid within a specified time and after several notices have been given, the property may be seized and sold at a foreclosure sale. On real property, one of two methods may be used: either the property may be seized and sold at a tax deed sale, or in some States the tax lien may be offered to investors in the form of a tax lien certificate with an accompanying right for the investor, after a specified period of time, to institute foreclosure proceedings.





Tax liens may be imposed for delinquent taxes owed on real property or personal property, or as a result of failure to pay income taxes or other taxes. Notice is given both to the property owner and mortgage holder when a property tax is delinquent; thus, even if the property owner does not have an escrow account on the mortgage, the mortgage company will receive notice of the delinquency and may pay the tax. The general rule is that where two or more creditors have competing liens against the same property, the creditor whose lien was perfected at the earlier time takes priority over the creditor whose lien was perfected at a later time; there are exceptions to this rule. All liens sold are secured by a first priority tax lien certificate placed on the property title by the county government. Revenue Officers have many techniques to collect money from taxpayers, for example, if a homeowner tried to get a home equity mortgage line of credit after a US tax lien has been filed, the bank would deny the loan because the IRS tax lien comes first. If you are new to investing in tax liens online, please visit http://tinyurl.com/bp38g5. As one means of generating lost income from delinquent taxpayers, county governments offer Tax Sales at auction to the public. During Tax Lien Sales, what is purchased at these auctions is not land, rather a debt to be collected on. By purchasing the right to collect past due taxes, a buyer is in essence loaning money to the property owner to pay their taxes. During Tax Deed Sales however, the winning bidder will own the deed and the land, having purchased it from the county or authority performing the sale.





Get all the answers you need to have a very successful tax lien investment. Our goal is to provide valuable information and services to individuals and firms involved in the investment of tax sale property. Tax sales, and more specifically tax deed sales, are not as complicated as you may first believe. For more than two hundred years, the United States government has levied taxes. As one means of generating lost income from delinquent taxpayers, county governments offer Tax Sales at auctions to the public. Home prices fell in a record four out of five U S cities in the third quarter as low-cost foreclosures flooded the market, and the U S housing market's decline continues to spread throughout the country. Have you ever dreamed of investing in tax liens, or other non-traditional assets, and not paying taxes on the profits? Well dream no more, because realizing tax-free or tax-deferred profits on tax liens and other alternative assets is a reality. There are Fantastic profits to be made investing in tax forfeited real estate and high yielding government issued tax lien certificates. Your Amazing Profits are just a click away: http://tinyurl.com/bp38g5.


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